Fonds P075 - Thomas More Institute fonds

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Thomas More Institute fonds

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  • Textual record

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Photocopied in 2001

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Fonds

Reference code

P075

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Issuing jurisdiction and denomination (philatelic)

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  • 1946-1967 (Creation)
    Creator
    Thomas More Institute

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Physical description

2 cm of textual records

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(1946-)

Administrative history

Montreal's Thomas More Institute was founded in 1946, with 90 students enrolled in six courses. Its aim is to provide opportunities for lifelong learning and liberal education for adults. More than 350 of its students have earned the degree of Bachelor of Arts: 271 from 1948 to 1974 within the context of an association with the Université de Montréal, and 95 since 1975 by virtue of an affiliation with Bishop's University.

Eric O'Connor, S.J., a teacher at Concordia University founding institution Loyola College from 1934-1936 and 1942-1980, was one of the founders of the Thomas More Institute.

The Institute is named after Thomas More (1478-1535), one of the great humanist scholars of the Renaissance. He contributed significantly to that critical shift from the medieval to the modern world by articulating and promoting, for men and women alike, a new concept of education based upon the priority of open inquiry and critical thought. In his view, learning occurs as individuals relate the formulations of the past to questions that point toward the future. The Thomas More Institute reflects this philosophy of education with a strong emphasis on lifelong adult learning.

Source: Thomas More Institute Web site (www.thomasmore.qc.ca)

Custodial history

Until 1991, the original documents were kept in the Loyola College vault where they had probably been deposited for safe keeping by Father R. Eric O’Connor, S. J., teacher at Loyola and one of the founders of the Institute. They were rediscovered among other Loyola College’s records and transferred to Concordia University Archives by the Concordia Student Accounts Office (Loyola campus) in May 1991. These originals were delivered to the Institute in January 2001.

Scope and content

The fonds provides information on the incorporation of the Thomas More Institute under provincial and federal legislation, the recognition of its curriculum, and the agreement that was in force between the Institute and the Université de Montréal.

The fonds consists of the Institute's letters patent, Father O'Connor's correspondence, and letters of agreement.

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The original documents are at the Thomas More Institute.

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