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Authority record

Magnus Isacsson

  • MI1
  • Person
  • 1948-2012

Magnus Isacsson, a Swedish-Canadian filmmaker, was born in Sweden in 1948 and moved to Canada in 1970. He studied political science at the University of Stockholm in Sweden and later in Montreal, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the Université de Montreal in 1973. He also studied history and cinema at McGill University and also took classes at Concordia University in Montreal, though he did not receive a degree from either institution. He was married to Jocelyne Clarke, documentary filmmaker and founder of Productions Pléiades. They had two children, Anna and Béthièle.

Early during his career, Isacsson worked as a radio producer for Swedish Broadcasting and the Canadian Broadcast Corporation (CBC). From 1980 to 1986 he was a producer for CBC’s English and French-language networks and worked as a producer for several programs, including Le Point, The Fifth State, and Contrechamps. Isacsson became an independent filmmaker in 1986.

With a documentary filmmaking career of over 25 years, Isacsson produced, wrote and directed several documentaries about critical social and political issues. During his career, he won several awards. Notably, he was the recipient of the Golden Sheaf Award for Uranium in 1991, and his film Power won best documentary at both the Paris International Environmental Film Festival in 1997 and at the Lausanne festival in 1999. Pressure Point (1999) received the Quebec Film Critics award for Best Documentary in 2000.

Magnus Isacsson was awarded the 2004 Prix Lumières from the Quebec Directors’ Association, and in 2012, Isacsson was named member Emeritus of the association. He was also a member of the Documentary Association of Canada, the Association des Réalisateurs et Réalisatrices du Québec (ARRQ), the Société des auteurs de radio, télévision et cinéma (Sartec), and was a former vice-president of the Observatoire du documentaire,

Isacsson was also an educator and throughout his career taught several courses and workshops about documentary film production. He taught at Concordia University in Montreal, Whitman College, the Quebec film school and at University of Montreal, among others. He also taught audiovisual production in South Africa and Zimbabwe and he collaborated in the production of teaching material Produire en Vidéo Légère volumes 1, 2 and 3.

His last film, Granny Power (2014), was completed and released posthumously by his wife Jocelyne Clarke.

Magnus Isacsson died in August 2012.

Concordia University. Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability

  • CULCDS1
  • Corporate body
  • 2001 -

Loyola College for Diversity and Sustainability (formerly known as Loyola International College) opened in 2002. It was founded by an inter-disciplinary group of professors drawn from science, social science and humanities departments in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences. From the outset the College’s main purpose was to provide a coherent program of interdisciplinary courses on the Loyola campus on a central issue of our time, specifically the challenges and opportunities of diversity.

Bernard, Joseph F.

  • JB1
  • Person
  • 1878-1972

In 1984-1985, Concordia University Archives (now Records Management and Archives) put together the Joseph F. Bernard collection to document the history of the Bernard Arctic Collection.

Born December 23, 1878, at Tignish, Prince Edward Island, Joseph F. Bernard became a trapper and trader in the Arctic Ocean. Joining his uncle Peter (Pete) Bernard, Joe Bernard arrived in Nome, Northern Alaska, in 1901. Later on with his 13-ton gasoline schooner, the Teddy Bear, he spent many years travelling in the Arctic waters, trading for furs, and collecting numerous ethnographic objects and natural history specimen. Bernard Harbour, in Nunavut, is named for Captain Joe Bernard. In the 1920s, Bernard settled in Cordova working as a commercial fisherman, then as Cordova’s harbormaster. Joseph F. Bernard died in Sitka, Alaska, on April 6, 1972. His life is largely evoked through “Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now,” (2013) by C. B. Bernard.

Between 1916 and 1920, he gathered an important collection of ethnographical and archaeological objects, mainly from the Copper Eskimos of Coronation Gulf. The assemblage is known as the Bernard Arctic Collection, Bernard Eskimo Collection, Bernard Collection, or the Bernard Inuit Collection. In 1921, he loaned his collection to Loyola College. He donated it in 1924 for a proposed College museum. The museum never materialized, and in 1947 Loyola College donated part of the collection to the Arctic Institute of North America in Montreal (the Institute moved to Calgary in 1976) and part to Cambridge University's Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. Other parts of the Collection were donated in 1991 to the Canadian Museum of Civilization and to Loyola High School in 1993; there may also be items from the Collection at the University of Washington Museum in Seattle, the Museum of the American Indian in New York, and the Museum of the University of Philadelphia.

Captain Joe Bernard’s life is evoked through the book “Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now” (Guilford, Connecticut: Lyons Press, 2013), by C. B. Bernard.

Hour

  • H1
  • Corporate body
  • 1993-2012

Administrative history: Hour, later renamed Hour Community, was an English-language newspaper published every Thursday in Montreal, Quebec, between February 1993 and April 2011. Founded by Pierre Paquet, Martin Siberok, Peter Wheeland, and Lubin Bisson, the first issue of Hour was published on February 4, 1993. Articles published in this weekly paper focused on music, film, art, and nightlife in Montreal. In addition to news coverage and feature pieces, Hour also included significant listings documenting current and upcoming events. At the time of it’s founding, Pierre Paquet was the President-Publisher, Martin Siberok was Editor-in-Chief, Peter Weiland was News Editor, Lubin Bisson was Director of Operations, Leslie McGregor was Arts & Entertainment Editor, Jean-Luc Bonin was Art Director, and proofreading with done by Peter Dunn. In April 2011, Hour changed its name to Hour Community and as a cost-cutting measure by the publisher and owner of the paper, the editorial staff was let go. At this time, Kevin Laforest was named the Editor-in-Chief. It was announced on May 2, 2012, that Hour Community would cease operations and its last issue would be published on May 3, 2012. At the time of its closure, Hour Community was owned by Communications Voir.

Participation Quebec

  • PQ1
  • Corporate body
  • 1976-1982

Participation Quebec was founded in November 1976. It was a non-profit public interest organization dedicated to bringing together the anglophone and francophone communities in Quebec. Participation Quebec was non-partisan and was not affiliated with any other organizations until its eventual merger with Alliance Quebec. The organization was incorporated under the laws of Quebec and was registered as a charity for tax purposes. In 1978, the members of its executive were Michael Prupas (President), David Steward (Treasurer) and François Goulet (Executive Director). At that time, the organization had approximately 200 members.

According to Participation Quebec, it's goals were: "to have a positive influence on the policies of education and governmental institutions which promote the isolation of cultural groups within Quebec, or which are prejudicial to the building of a Quebec for all Quebecers" and "to improve the relations between the French and non-French speaking communities in Montreal." Throughout its years of Operation, Participation Quebec hosted symposiums, formed committees, sponsored meetings with government officials, prepared and tabled briefs, held press conferences, and organized speaker series, among other activities.

In May 1982, Participation Quebec and other anglophone rights organizations, including the Positive Action Committee, merged with Alliance Québec.

Richardson, Boyce

  • BR1
  • Person
  • March 21, 1928-March 7, 2020

Boyce Richardson, journalist, writer and documentary filmmaker, was born in Wyndham, New Zealand, March 21, 1928. He was married for 56 years to teacher and poet Shirley (Norton) Richardson (d. 2007). They had four children. Richardson died in Montreal, Quebec, on March 7, 2020 at the age of 92.

Richardson began work as a journalist in New Zealand, then moved to Australia. He travelled in India, then moved to Britain, where he studied writing. He immigrated to Canada in 1954 where he worked first for The Winnipeg Free Press, before hemoved to Montreal and joined The Montreal Star in 1957. He was the Star's correspondent in London from 1960 to 1968. He became a full-time freelancer in 1971, interested in particular in First Nation issues. He wrote for National Film Board films. In these and the book Strangers Devour the Land (1976), he chronicled the assault on the hunting way of life of the Cree Indians of Quebec.

He co-won a 1961 National Newspaper Award for a series of articles on Canada and the European Economic Community. His film Cree Hunter of Mistassini won the British Society for Film and Television Arts Flaherty Award in 1974 and a Melbourne Film Festival Special Award. Other awards include a Golden Apple at the 1990 U.S. National Educational Film and Video Festival and a 1990 Red Ribbon Award at the American Film and Video Festival for Super-Companies. He was invested a Member of the Order of Canada in 2002.

Fry, Christopher

  • CF1
  • Person
  • 18 December 1907 – 30 June 2005

Christopher Fry was an English poet and playwright. He was born in Bristol, England, on December 18, 1907, to Charles John Harris, a master builder and lay preacher in the Church of England, and Emma Marguerite Fry Hammond Harris. Born Arthur Hammond Harris, the playwright adopted the surname Fry for his maternal grandmother. In his late twenties he adopted the name Christopher Fry. Fry attended the Bedford Modern School, where he developed an appreciation for the theater. It is here that he wrote his first play at age 11. In 1929, after working briefly as a teacher, Fry devoted himself to the dramatic arts. In addition to acting, directing, and writing, he also ran a repertory company in Tunbridge Wells, which he founded in 1932. In 1939 Fry became the artistic director of the Oxford Playhouse.

Christopher Fry was a prolific playwright. Major theatrical works include: The Boy with a Cart (1938), The Tower (1939), A Phoenix too Frequent (1946), The Firstborn (1948), Thor, With Angels (1948), The Lady’s Not For Burning (1948), Venus Observed (1950), The Dark Is Light Enough (1954), and A Yard of Sun (1970). Adaptations include Ring around the Moon (1950) and The Lark (1955) by Jean Anouilh, Tiger at the Gates (1956), Duel of Angels (1958), and Judith (1962) by Jean Giraudoux, and Peer Gynt (1970) by Henrik Ibsen. Fry was also the screenwriter for the following movies: The Beggar’s Opera (1953), Ben-Hur (1959), The Bible: In the Beginning (1966), and Barabbas (1969).

Christopher Fry was nominated for a Tony Award for Best Play in 1956 for his adaptation of Giraudoux’s play Tiger at the Gates. He was awarded the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry in 1962. In the same year he was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of Literature. In 1999 The Lady’s not for Burning was voted as one of the best plays of the twentieth century in a poll conducted by the National Theater. Fry died in Chichester, England, June 30, 2005.

Mather, Edith

  • EM1
  • Person
  • 1925-2017

Edith H. Mather is a Montreal-based photographer and a former Collections Services staff member at Concordia University Libraries. She was born in Hampstead, Quebec, in 1925. She studied Science at McGill University until 1946. In 1964, Edith Mather married poet Bryan McCarthy. They lived in Westmount, Montreal. After the birth of her son, Mather started with photography. Mather is known for her candid black and white images of Montreal, which she developed and printed in her home. Her collection was donated to the McCord Museum of Canadian History in 2012. Her photographs document the evolution of Montreal’s urban landscape. Many focus on the demolition that occurred in Saint-Henri prior to the building of the Ville-Marie Expressway. Mather published "Touches of fantasy on Montreal Streets" in 1977. Edith Mather retired from Concordia University Libraries at age 82. She was friends with Irving Layton.
Edith Mather died in Montreal in 2017.

Conseil québécois de l’estampe

  • CQE1
  • Corporate body
  • 1978-2005

The Conseil québécois de l’estampe (CQE) was established in 1978 under the name of Conseil de la gravure du Québec. It contributes to the visibility of emerging printmaking artists by organizing exhibitions and facilitating networking among artists and partner organizations through meetings and events. The CQE aims to improve the conditions of artists and raise awareness of their practices through publications like Code d’éthique de l’estame originale first published in 1983. In 1988, the CQE created the Prix Albert-Dumouchel to award new printmaking artists and in 2002, it created the Mois de l’estampe, later renamed as Mois de l’art imprimé. The name of the organization was changed from Conseil de la gravure du Quebec to Conseil québécois de l’estampe in 1983. In 2005, the CQE became Arprim (Regroupement pour la promotion de l’art imprimé) as a response to the new needs in the printmaking art scene.

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