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Authority record

Charney, Melvin

  • MC4
  • Person
  • August 28,1935-September 17, 2012

Melvin Charney was born in Montreal on August 28,1935 and died on September 17, 2012. He studied at the school of art at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and at McGill and Yale Universities. He lived and worked in Paris and New York and resided in Montreal. A teacher at the Université de Montréal and an internationally recognized artist-architect, Charney organized Corridart dans la rue Sherbrooke, a major project of the Arts and Culture program of the international 1976 Olympic Games in Montreal. In addition to designing the ensemble of common elements that ran along Sherbrooke Street between Atwater Avenue and Blvd. Pie-IX, Charney created the Corridart installation Les Maisons de la rue Sherbrooke.

Clark, David

  • DC4
  • Person
  • [ca. 1947]-2015

David Clark, a musician, was born in England around 1947 to a musician father.

Clark moved to Montreal in 1968. He received a Bachelor of Music (Performance) from McGill University in 1972. As a student, he played with the McGill Jazz Workshop. Adept in both classical music and jazz, Clark worked as a saxophonist, clarinetist, orchestral arranger and conductor, performing with various well-known orchestras, including the Canada Symphony Orchestra, the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, the Andrew Homzy Jazz Orchestra, and others. Clark was a member of Walter Boudreau’s Quatuor de saxophones de Montréal / Montreal Saxophone Quartet for 15 years, until the 1990s. During the 1990s, Clark spent several summers working as the musical director and bandleader on the cruise ship Amerikanis. Clark also worked as a music teacher at both Vanier College and Concordia University. He taught at Concordia University until 2009 and at Vanier College until 2014. In the 1980s and 1990s, David Clark was a member of the Fossils Club of Montreal, which was founded in 1926 by a group of Westmount High School graduates. Its annual musical productions allowed the club to raise money to allow for underprivileged children in Montreal to attend summer camp. During the 1980s and 1990s, Clark created arrangements and served as conductor for several of the Fossils’ productions. The club existed until around 1996. Clark also played with the Orchestre symphonique de Montréal at Carnegie Hall in New York City, a performance that he considers to be the apex of his career.

David Clark died on September 4, 2015, at the age of 68.

Clark, Gerald

  • GC1
  • Person
  • 1918 - 2005

Gerald Clark was born in Montreal in 1918. He died in 2005. He was married and had a daughter, Bette. In 1939 he graduated from McGill University, where he had been editor of the college daily.

In 1940 he began his newspaper career working for The Standard of Montreal as a parliamentary correspondent in Ottawa. In 1943 he went overseas as a war correspondent and covered the Allied invasion of Normandy (D-Day) and the entry of Paris by the Free French. He was one of the 15 correspondents representing the world's press at the signing of the German surrender in Reims. Later he covered the Nuremberg and Pétain trials. A series of articles on the Soviet Union, accompanied by his own photographs, won a National Newspaper Award (1953). Gerald Clark took photographs on many of his trips, which served to illustrate his articles. For two years he was The Montreal Star's correspondent in New York, covering the United Nations. As the Star's Chief Foreign Correspondent, 1955-1960, he was based in London and traveled widely in Europe and the Iron Curtain countries. He was a frequent contributor to Weekend magazine. In 1954 he made a lecture tour of Canada under the auspices of Weekend, describing his experiences in Russia. He became the editor of the Montreal Star, retaining the post until 1979 when the paper ceased publication. He contributed many articles to the Reader's Digest.

Among many other travels, in 1955 he joined the Hon. Lester B. Pearson, then Minister of External Affairs, on a round-the-world flight which included Asia, Russia, the Middle East, and Europe. In 1956 he covered the NATO Foreign Ministers' Conference in Paris and the Poznan riots in Poland. He also visited Budapest and Prague and wrote a series on Hungary and Czechoslovakia. In 1957 he reported from Brussels, Algiers and Cairo. In 1958 he traveled to Red China; he was one of only two Western correspondents reporting on Communist China from the inside. His dispatches ran in newspapers in Canada and the United States, including The New York Times. Upon his return, he wrote Impatient Giant: Red China Today. It was translated into Danish and German. He won an Emmy and a Sylvania award as the co-author of the hour-long CBC documentary The Face of Red China.

His other books were The Coming Explosion in Latin America (1964); Canada: The Uneasy Neighbour: A Lucid Account of the Political Manoeuvers and the Social and Economic Pressures Which Shape Canada's Future (1965); Montreal: The New Cité in English and French editions (1982); and For Good Measure: The Sam Steinberg Story (1986). His memoir No Mud on the Back Seat: Memoirs of a Reporter was published in 1995 by Robert Davies Publishing.

Clarke, Douglass B.

  • DBC1
  • Person
  • 1907-1979

Douglass Burns Clarke was born in Montreal on October 13, 1907. He married Dorothy Adams and had two children, Barbara and Frederick. D.B. Clarke died in 1979. He graduated from Sir George Williams College as a member of the Guinea Pig Graduating Class of 1937, so-called because it was the first graduating class the College produced. In 1932, he joined the teaching staff of the College as a lecturer, and he accepted a full-time position in English and Fine Arts after his graduation. He loved theatre and from 1932 to 1941 he was a director of the Playmakers Workshop of Sir George Williams College. He founded the Georgiantics musical revue. In 1942 he became the production manager for the Lakeshore Summer Theatre and was involved with the Montreal Repertory Theatre, among others. He was appointed acting registrar of Sir George Williams in 1943, and in 1946 he was appointed registrar. In 1956 he was appointed vice-principal and stayed on as registrar until 1962. From 1967 to 1968 he was vice-principal academic. In 1968 he was appointed acting principal and vice-chancellor. He retired in 1969. He wrote a history of Sir George Williams in the period following that covered by Henry F. Hall in The Georgian Spirit: The Story of Sir George Williams University. Douglass Clarke's work, published in 1976 was entitled Decades of Decisions: Sir George Williams University, 1952-53 to 1972-73. He influenced the university to welcome the arts and increased its importance in the cultural life of Montreal. The D.B. Clarke Theatre in the Hall Building is named in his memory.

Clinch, Harry

  • HC1
  • Person
  • 1921-1998

Harry Clinch began teaching geography part-time at Sir George Williams College in 1953. He was appointed a full-time assistant professor of geography in 1959, and promoted to associate professor in 1964, a position he held following the 1974 merger of Sir George Williams with Loyola College to form Concordia University. He retired in 1983.

Clyke, Graeme

  • GC2
  • Person
  • August 30, 1936-

Graeme Baxter Clyke was born on August 30, 1936, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, to Emily (Davis) Clyke and Stanley Clyke. He has one sister, Dr. Sharon (Clyke) Oliver, former president of the Black Loyalist Heritage Society in Nova Scotia. His aunt is Nova Scotian businesswoman Viola Desmond.

Clyke moved to Montreal’s Little Burgundy neighborhood when he was a young child, briefly returning to Nova Scotia before settling in Montreal with his family around 1942. He briefly lived in New York City as a teenager. Clyke graduated from Royal Arthur School and Westmount High School in Montreal. He continued his education at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts and then the École des Beaux Arts, where he studied under Arthur Lismer. After graduation, Clyke worked for photographer Hugh Frankel, and later established himself as a freelance photographer and dark room technician. He worked on notable projects, including Expo 67 and the 1976 Olympics. In 1970 Clyke opened “Graeme Sights and Sounds” on Westminster Avenue in Montreal West. The store, which sold records in the front and had a studio in the back, closed in 1972 when Clyke returned to school. Clyke obtained his bachelor of Fine Arts in 1981 from Sir George Williams University, now Concordia University. Clyke opened a second studio around 1983, “Graeme’s Photo Studio,” at 5934 Sherbrook Street West in the Montreal neighbourhood of Notre-Dame-de-Grâce. “Graeme’s Photo Studio” later moved to 14 Milner Street in Montreal West.

Graeme Clyke attended the Negro Community Centre as a child and was involved with the Centre throughout his life. His parents were also deeply involved in the Center, his father working as the Executive Director and his mother as a social worker. Graeme Clyke’s wife, Betty-Lou (Headley) Clyke, also attended the Centre. Graeme Clyke met Betty-Lou when they were children. They were married in September 1963. Their son, Graeme Stanley Clark, was born in 1970.

Cohn, Norman

  • NC1
  • Person
  • 1915-2007

Norman Cohn was a professor at the University of Sussex and a fellow of the British Academy. He was a research fellow at Concordia University in 1982.

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