Showing 1922 results

Authority record

Bayne, Clarence

  • CB1
  • Person

Clarence S. Bayne joined Sir George Williams University in 1966 as a lecturer in statistics. From 1967 to 1969, he was a lecturer in quantitative methods; in 1969 he was appointed assistant professor of quantitative methods. Following the merger of Sir George Williams and Loyola College to form Concordia University in 1974, he was appointed associate professor of quantitative methods. In 1987, he was made associate professor of decision sciences and management information systems. Dr. Bayne has been an advocate for the Black community in Montreal.

Bazar, Beatrice

  • BB1
  • Person
  • October 14, 1914-September 28, 2009

Beatrice Millman Bazar was born on October 14, 1914 in Montreal, Quebec, as the daughter of Aaron and Rose Millman. She was married to Bernard Bazar. They had two sons, Leonard and Ronald. Beatrice Bazar died on September 28, 2009 at the age of 94. Beatrice Bazar was involved in the community at the local and national level. In 1935, she helped open the first pre-kindergarten Montessori school recognized by the Quebec government. Bazar co-founded the Dominion Gallery of Art with her mother, and the Youth Division of The Canadian Jewish Congress. She served on many boards, including the United Nations Association in Canada, where she served as president, was the director of the Canadian Human Rights Foundation, was the president for the Canadian Institute for International Affairs, and the Chair of the Foundation for International Training in Third World Countries.

Bazar received several medals throughout her life including the Order of Canada, which was awarded on October 25, 1990.

Bell, Don

  • DB1
  • Person
  • November 17, 1936 - March 6, 2003

Donald Herbert Bell (known also as Don The Bookman Bell) was an author, dramatist, journalist-much of his writing was humorous-and a seller of used and rare books. He was born November 17, 1936 in Brooklyn, N.Y. In 1941 his family moved to Montreal. His parents were Sam Bell and Claire Bell (d. 1983). The family name at the time of Don Bell's birth was Belitzky. His brother was Arthur Bell (1932-1984), who worked in publishing in New York and then became a writer at the Village Voice. His sister was Doreen Bell (married name: Resnick). Don Bell studied at Baron Byng High School and Mount Royal High School and then at McGill University, graduating in 1957 with a degree in commerce with an English major. He married Céline Dubé in 1962. They had two children, Daniel and Valerie, and later divorced. In the 1980s he married Odile Perret and divided his time between Paris and Sutton, Quebec. He died in Montreal March 6, 2003, age 67.

In the 1960s he had a number of jobs as a journalist, working for a time at CBC International Services and then at newspapers including the Montreal Herald, the Calgary Herald, and the Montreal Gazette. From 1967 onward, he worked as a freelance writer of articles, fiction (short stories and novellas), and film and radio scripts for a wide variety of Canadian and American magazines, newspapers, and other media. He did photography to illustrate his articles. He wrote the Expo publicity booklet short book Film at Expo 67 (published by Expo 67, 1967). A collection of his short stories was published as Saturday Night at the Bagel Factory and Other Montreal Stories (McClelland and Stewart, 1972). It won the Stephen Leacock Memorial Award for Humour for 1974. His book Pocketman was published by Dorset Publications in 1979. In 1976, he won the Canadian Authors Association Air Canada award for humour. In 1978 he won a Jewish Book Month award. 1n 1986 he won the Molson Silver Award for the Best Canadian Sports Writing category of the National Magazine Awards. For a number of years he researched the life and death of magician Harry Houdini, creating a manuscript for a book that was published posthumously as The Man Who Killed Houdini by Véhicule Press in 2004. He wrote a number of other books, usually compilations and reworkings of his articles and stories, that were never published.

In the 1980s he opened a second-hand bookstore in Sutton, Quebec. During his travels he scouted books and in the summers he sold books at his store, La Librairie Founde Bookes in Sutton. He had a column, Founde Bookes, in Books in Canada magazine, dealing with his life as a book scout and dealer. Bookspeak, a chapbook based on his experience scouting and selling used and rare books, was published by Typographeum in 2000.

Bell, Joe

  • JB1
  • Person
  • 1908-1972

Joe Bell was born December 20, 1908 in Chester-Le-Street, Durham, England. He emigrated with his family to Canada in 1919 and settled in Toronto. He married in 1934, and he and his wife Anne had a daughter, Joan. He died in Montreal December 4, 1972.

He received musical training through membership in the Salvation Army Dovercourt Corps Band. He worked as a bank clerk, but wanted to earn his living as a trombonist. In 1934 he left Toronto and the Old Mill, where he had been playing with the Leo Romanelli Dance Orchestra, to join the Kramer Band in Montreal. There he played in numerous night clubs such as The Lido, Chez Maurice, and The Normandie Roof in the Mount Royal Hotel. From 1945 to 1965 Joe Bell played with the Montreal Symphony Orchestra as first trombone, and then as second. He also taught at McGill University's Music Department, as well as at the McGill Summer Music School in the Eastern Townships. He retired in 1965.

Results 76 to 100 of 1922