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Authority record

Armstrong, Muriel

  • MA1
  • Person

Professor Muriel Armstrong, after pursuing undergraduate degrees in Arts (1943) and in Education (1947) from the University of Alberta, obtained an M. Sc. degree in Economics from McGill University in 1954. Professor Muriel Armstrong joined Sir George Williams University in 1957 as a part-time lecturer in Economics. She was then hired full-time as an Assistant Professor in 1961. She became Associate Professor and then Professor in 1965 and 1969 respectively. At the beginning of 1969, she was part of an ad hoc discussion group of students and faculty on the events that were happening at Sir George Williams University which led to the Computer Centre Incident. Along with their discussions, the group published five issues of a small newspaper called “Statement”. Apart from teaching, Professor Armstrong was also active in numerous administrative capacities, such as Chair of the Department of Economics several times and Associate Dean in the Faculty of Arts, from 1972 to 1976. Professor Armstrong’s academic research focus was the Canadian economy, she published a book in 1970 entitled “The Canadian Economy and its Problems” (Toronto: Prentice Hall) which was re-edited various times. Professor Armstrong retired from Concordia University in 1991.

Art, Jack

  • JA3
  • Person
  • [19-?]

Arthur and Marilouise Kroker

  • AMK1
  • Family

Arthur and Marilouise Kroker are writers, lecturers, and editors in the area of technology and contemporary culture. Arthur Kroker studied at McMaster University where he received a Ph.D. in political science in 1975. In 1975 he became an assistant professor, and in 1980, an associate professor at the University of Winnipeg. He joined Concordia University's Political Science Department in 1981 as associate professor. In 1988, he was appointed professor of political science.

Arthur and Marilouise Kroker were founders and editors of the Canadian Journal of Political and Social Theory (CJPST), in 1976 at the University of Winnipeg. They and the CJPST moved to Concordia University in 1981. The aim of the CJPST is to provide a gathering-point for political, social and cultural theory, both in Canada and globally. It aims to synthesize theoretical reflection and analysis of the public situation, to mediate theory and contemporary history. In 1993 Arthur and Marilouise Kroker relaunched the journal in electronic format on the Internet under the name CTHEORY: Theory, Technology and Culture (http://ctheory.net/ctheory_wp/home/). Arthur and Marilouise Kroker were also publishers of the New Worlds Perspectives series of monographs in which they were editors of the CultureTexts Series.

Aubes 3935

  • A1
  • Corporate body
  • November 1981-March 1990

Aubes 3935 was founded in November 1981 by Annie Molin Vasseur who managed the gallery until its closure on March 25, 1990. The gallery specialized in art books, and, among other things, it organized a national (1984) and an international (1986) contest for Canadian art books. The gallery later expanded to exhibit contemporary art (painting, drawing, sculpture, installation art, etc.) by artists from Quebec, the rest of Canada, Europe, and the United States.

Babarik, Paul

  • PB2
  • Person

Paul Babarik was born on June 30, 1929 in Oshawa and died in Montreal on December 27, 2019. He studied psychology at the University of Toronto and at the University of Chicago, from which he earned his PhD. He worked in behavioural psychology in Washington before returning to Canada due to opposition to the Vietnam War. He joined Loyola College in 1970 as an associate professor of psychology, a position he held until his retirement in 1992. Between 1975 and 1978 he studied the Canadian roots of community psychology and the Canadian psychologist William Line (1897-1964).

Baculis, Al

  • AB4
  • Person
  • 1930-2007

Al Baculis was a Canadian clarinetist and composer. He was born in Lachine, Montreal on November 21, 1930, as Joseph George Alphonse Allan Baculis. He was the son of Lithuanian immigrants. From 1948 to 1951, he studied clarinet at McGill University, and from 1952 to 1956 he studied composition. Baculis married Margo MacKinnon in 1963. They lived in Montreal and had two children, Heather and Alan Jr.

During the 1950s, Al Baculis played with the Canadian All Stars, but also with various bands led by Buck Lacombe. In 1958, he started to do studio work for the CBC. Around the same time, Al Baculis played and composed for several NFB films. From around 1965 to 1972, he led the Al Baculis Singers, a studio group working mainly for radio and television. Also in the 1960s, he led the Al Baculis Octet. Al Baculis wrote arrangements for the Ted Elfstrom Octet and played saxophone in the Johnny Holmes Orchestra. In the mid-1960s, Baculis performed with Vic Vogel's band for Canadian soldiers in Europe and the Middle East. Al Baculis composed and arranged the theme for the closing ceremonies of the 1976 Montréal Olympics. From 1977 to 1986, Al Baculis taught arranging and composition at Vanier College, Montreal, and at McGill University, Montreal, from 1978 to 1983.

Al Baculis died on January 22, 2007 in Seminole, Florida, where he had lived since his retirement in 1993.

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